tnba-text

Blog

short_line content-donate short_line justtextgiving

Putting the summer to good use

We always like to profile our amazing volunteers and this month, we’ve asked Charlotte to step forward. One of her key responsibilities has been to help us prepare for the Magic of the Mind dinner in June – thank you for all your hard work, Charlotte!

Hello, my name is Charlotte and I have just completed my second year of a BA Linguistics degree at University College London.

During my first year, I signed up to the UCL Volunteering Society and I would receive weekly emails alerting me to volunteering opportunities. It was one of these messages that notified me of the existence of The National Brain Appeal – immediately I knew that it was a charity that I wanted to work with so I got in touch with Tallulah and Jess.

  Read more

Q&A with Elizabeth

Elizabeth Kornat became a Trustee of the charity in 2010. Though she describes herself as new to this role “learning as I go along”, she has been instrumental in helping to support our Small Acorns Fund . We wanted to learn more about Elizabeth’s role and why TNBA is so important to her… Read more

Is the street the right place …

… to fundraise?

My morning walk from Russell Square tube station can be a minefield and it’s not just where I get off the train – it’s all over the country: people on the street in front of stations, on high streets outside shops. They wear branded t-shirts and clutch clipboards. It’s something you notice often, especially when you work in the third sector.

Two recent articles focused my attention to this trend of asking to people to become charitable donors in the middle of the street.

Read more

Girl power!

Last month, Ashleigh Steward, her mum Sharon, Sharon’s friends Debbie and Linda and their daughters Emily and Jessica conquered Ben Nevis to raise over £3,500 for The National Hospital.

Let’s hear more about their story from Ashleigh…

In February 2012 my mum Sharon suffered a totally unexpected subarachnoid brain haemorrhage. She was rushed to hospital and then transferred to The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery where she stayed for three weeks. They performed two emergency operations and looked after her until she was well enough to go home.

Read more

Stroke enables artist Mark Ware to see in a new way

Award-winning artist Mark Ware has created images responding to Exeter Cathedral’s 900 year history and reflecting his altered perception of the world brought about by a stroke in 1996 at the age of 39.

Exeter Cathedral has been the setting and subject for Cathedra 900, Mark’s latest multimedia project funded by Arts Council England. For the past eighteen months Mark has explored the cathedral and interpreted its art and architecture through photography, abstract photomontages, 3D artwork and sound.

Mark said:
“Stroke affects everything I do and how I perceive the world. It influences all my art and it keeps me in the ‘here and now’ because of the physical and mental challenges it presents me with. In addition it has given me a wonderful insight into how the senses work, which in turn inspires the art that I now create.

“My Exeter Cathedral images and abstract photomontages were created in response to the building, particularly to its extraordinary medieval architecture and design, and I hope that they offer a meaningful experience to those who see the work. Cathedra 900 has been a profoundly rewarding project. I’m privileged and honoured to be participating in Exeter Cathedral’s 900 year timeline, contributing to the centuries of artistic activity within its walls.”

During October 2013, as part of Cathedra 900, Mark staged three performances of 900 Years of Light, and event which featured film, readings, music, and the premiere of Mark’s video composition accompanied by specially arranged music performed by internationally acclaimed trumpeter, Crispian Steele-Perkins with Lyric Strings trio.

The video composition brought together Mark’s photography showing details, patterns and architectural shapes, creating illusions of stillness and movement. During the screening of the work, the cathedral appeared to breathe as its vaulted ceiling was cast with slowly changing light, and the live music resonated throughout the building. 3D images on fabric banners hanging on the Cathedral’s columns added an extra dimension to the Cathedral’s architecture when viewed through coloured glasses.

The next phase of Mark’s work includes an exhibition at the Royal Devon & Exeter Hospital in Exeter early in 2014 through Exeter Healthcare Arts. As a taster for Mark’s exhibition, three of his images will be shown as part of a larger exhibition including work by other artists which will be on show from 25 until 25 February 2014.

Mark has been involved with supporting The National Brain Appeal and a number of other charities since having a stroke and his images are now being offered for sale, benefiting charities in the process.

Mark said:
“My family and I have benefited from the work of a number of charities and I wanted to give something back. My art seemed an ideal way to do this, so my work will be sold through a number of charities (including The National Brain Appeal) which will receive 30% of the profits.”

 

short_line Fun Raise short_line home-content-heroes short_line