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From Scrubs to scrubs

We are over the moon that Funzee, the one-stop shop for onesies (seriously, the selection is endless…) is our official Pyjama Party supporter. Mark Heselgrave, owner and founder, spoke to us about why his team will be supporting us next month.

The idea for Funzees started in 2007. I was looking to buy an adult onesie as an amusing present for my son, who’s a big fan of hospital comedy Scrubs. There’s a great episode where the main character, JD, is wearing a onesie to bed but is forcibly taken out to a bar by his mentor, Dr. Cox, while still wearing his “jammies”.

We found the concept really funny and I immediately began looking for an adult onesie for my son, both online and in various retail outlets, but couldn’t find anything that matched what we were after. So, you know what they say, “if you want something done right, do it yourself!” Read more

The Big 100

Rolling with the legacy of last year’s Olympics, this month saw the first ever Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 – as the name suggests, a gruelling hundred mile cycle through the hills of Surrey and the city roads.

Thank you to Kirsty Brown, Peter Godsall and Vaughan Ward, the three intrepid riders who cycled for The National Brain Appeal. Here, Vaughan shares his story of the up-hill struggles and the sweet, sweet downs …

On the 14th of May I received a rather unexpected text message from my good friend Clare asking if I was interested in taking part in a charity bike ride for The National Brain Appeal. I happily accepted – only to then realise it was a hundred miles long.

Although daunted at first by the prospect, I soon became extremely excited to ride an adaptation of the Olympic road race and cover the same tarmac as the great Bradley Wiggins and Lizzie Armitstead.

I have to admit that this was my first exposure to The National Brain Appeal but I quickly found that everyone has something in common with the charity. They campaign for such a wide range of conditions and illnesses that seem to touch everyone I know in one way or another.

My training began well, taking thirty mile cycles down the picturesque Lea Valley into rural Hertfordshire. The rolling hills, even in bad weather, were a breath of fresh air from the stop/start congestion of the streets of London. However, I made a serious error in my training; I continued my normal routine, which consisted of football, predictably injured myself and had only six weeks left to train.

The fast-track training proved to have mixed emotions. Hours upon hours on the bike gave me time to think but the road soon felt like a lonely place without a training partner. The thunderstorms began, which made it harder, but when the clouds cleared I had some great experiences too. There was the triple rainbow, the time I had to stop on a country lane to let a family of ducks casually waddle across the road and, on the several occasions I became lost, passers-by would ask about the charity on the jersey that I was proudly wearing. A lady shared a story with me about how she had recently recovered from a brain aneurysm. It was a lovely moment to share her joy at the side of the road.

My fundraising went better than expected; the support I received from friends, family and beyond was fantastic.

The day arrived: I had trained and raised a great amount of money but had doubts about completing the task that loomed over me. What I wasn’t prepared for was how emotional the six and a half hours of cycling would be.

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The anticipation on the start line was incredible. Everyone was anxious to get their legs turning. The race began by making a few cycling companions until the point when our speeds no longer kept us together. We stretched out and I met the beginnings of the beautiful Surrey countryside. It wasn’t until about fifty miles in that it started to get difficult.

I’d met the climb that everyone thought was Leith Hill but that monster – the one that keeps going up and up on every turn – was still yet to come. When it did, my legs started to burn and many were walking. I didn’t care how slowly I went; I was determined not to get off my bike. I reached the summit to discover one of the most beautiful descents of my life. With everyone travelling under their own steam it suddenly felt like a different time.

The fun didn’t last long: the roads did claim some casualties as they aren’t without their dangers and the ascents began once more.

I soon learnt that the infamous Box Hill is actually the little brother to Leith Hill: Leith Hill saps you of your energy and Box Hill sets to finish you off. It was not to succeed. I stopped only momentarily to hug my Mum, who had travelled from Leicestershire with her boyfriend to provide me with my second wind. At this point, I was struggling and close to tears. I had never felt so emotionally compromised by a physical task before.

I felt a little pathetic. The National Brain Appeal calls their fundraisers ‘heroes’, but I only have to be one for a day; those who I aim to help have to be heroes everyday. It is this that drove me on.

With thirty miles to go, the carnival atmosphere began. Bands on the sides of the roads and people lining the street made you feel like you had already finished. You hadn’t; there was still a distance to go but pelotons formed and everyone was driving one another home. I limped towards the ten-mile mark after a bout of cramp but finished fast in a sporting sprint with four others. I’d done it.

My friends lined the finish with banners and my girlfriend had made a t-shirt with my face on it. I struggled to take it all in through the shakes of completing the task. The sense of relief and achievement forced a smile to my face. I celebrated with chips, a shandy, friends and thinking of all those I hope we’ve helped.

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Three cheers for Radford Wallis!

You may have noticed on Twitter or Facebook that we’ve been counting down to a website launch. If you’ve missed what we’re getting excited about, take a look at the Pyjama Party website, which officially kicks off our second Pyjama Party campaign.

To build the site, we worked again with Radford Wallis, the design agency who created our new brand back in 2009. Since then, they’ve supported us with everything from event materials to print literature – and even took part last year in our first ever PJ Party, donning nightcaps for a ‘Head to Head’ pub crawl!

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Small Acorns take seed

You may remember that May saw the launch of our Small Acorns Fund, a grant programme for small projects suggested by members of staff at The National.

The results are in – and of the seventeen individuals who applied, we were delighted to award over £25,000 to six innovative and life-changing proposals. The successful projects focus on improving the lives of people at The National, whether that’s through pieces of specialist equipment, training for staff or rehabilitation programmes.

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Stuck in the middle…

… or bridging the gap?

Last month we joined in with celebrating Small Charities Week and as I write, small really is beautiful. I find it hugely encouraging that there are so many programmes and resources to help small charities.

The criteria for these programmes are often are aimed at charities which turn over less than £1.5 million. It got me thinking about what happens when, like us, your turnover can straddle either side of that mark. One year we may be under, one year we may be over. Is The National Brain Appeal small, or are we medium? What happens when sometimes you qualify and other times don’t? Read more

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